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of an internet sales tax has reared up again and, in fact, the u.s. congress and many states are looking at this issue, and that's our topic this week on "the communicators." now, we want to start off by talking with the chairman of the california state board of equalization, jerome horton. mr. horton, california has recently changed how it manages or its taxation policies when it comes to the internet, hasn't it? >> guest: yes, peter, it has. it broadened the definition of what's taxable in california to include online retailers who meet certain criteria. >> host: now, you said you've broadened. how was it before, and now who is included? >> guest: prior to the law, the sales tax didn't apply to companies that had affiliates and worked through various different groups here in the state of california. the law broadened the definition of who actually qualifies to include those individuals. so now online retailers who have affiliates in the state of california who also have some form of brick and mortar either directly or indirectly working through other groups and partnerships and so fort
support of mitt romney. he will also talk about his views on u.s. foreign aid. join us for "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> we want to introduce to you robert o'harrow, an investigative reporter at the washington post. he has been riding an occasional series on cyber security threats for that newspaper. mr. o'harrow, welcome to "the communicators." let's start with 0 day. what is zero day? >> zero day is the name that hackers give to a vulnerability and software that allows a bad guy into a computer system. these gaps take a lot of forms. they have not been previously discovered. so there is no way to block them. when a hacker has a zero day, with the right tools and school bills, they can't. into a system and take control. -- with the right tools and skills, they can take over system. >> how would you describe this series? >> it is really the mission that we were looking into cyber security and cyber war. the pentagon had declared cyberspace the environment of people and machines and networks as a new domain of war, and get we realize that maybe one in 1000 people real
the federal government can work cooperatively with the private sector in improving u.s. economic competitiveness in whatever ranger is. the administration has done a number of private-partnerships -- private-public partnerships. as a broad philosophical focus for what he thinks on that as a progressive agenda to help boost our economic competitiveness around the globe -- on telecom communications in particular, i am far less than -- of an expert then he is. in general, i would say the administration is much more in the regulatory, how to deal with various constituencies, of various different businesses trying to balance the different issues, the different kinds of industries, at. these administration looks on -- and i may be speaking to broadly here -- i think the administration looks more on the far reaching investments in science and innovation as their policy agenda, compared to trying to work out where telecommunications firms can invest, because they can do that pretty well on the rhone. they are quick to adapt. there are regulatory issues that define that there. >> the same
/seventh of the u.s. economy, the largest market frame. the answer from amazon was an unequivocal, no. they've began collecting in many states and they don't see a lowering in sales. it proves people aren't buying on amazon to avoid the sales tax. they pay for shipping and have to stand in line at the post office or ups store to return something. so it's not a saving of sales tax, and if california businesses are looking for this to save them, they have another think coming. the biggest threat is the wal-marts and tarrings and shopping malls and not the internet. >> in terms of fairness -- and let's take it to the small business -- collecting sales tax seems to be a huge burden on -- maybe some of your small businesses are going to be below some of the thresh holds but still some that are relatively small, have national presence because they're online. it seems very burden some for them to have to try and figure out their sales tax liability. is it fair, then, to ask them when they stand to lose money, that they nonetheless have to collect sales tax? >> i think certainly there is an administrative b
it was developed by the u.s. government? >> guest: yes according to the reporting. >> host: what was its purpose? was at a defense mechanism by the defense department? >> guest: no, it was a purely preemptive effort to slow the nuclear weapons processing capability of iran. >> host: you mention charlie miller and mr. miller is in st. louis and he joins us today on "the communicators." mr. miller, what was your goal in breaking into the iphone? >> guest: in that particular case it was for a concept like robert mentioned. they had hackers across the world and they had various devices. if you break into a device you can wind some cash in the device also. i won the contest a few times. earlier my career was more about showing things like iphones or you know, apple software were vulnerable because it really was an believe that it was but now it's just -- i have shown vulnerabilities in the iphone and attacks where i can send a text message to the iphone and taken over. all these are fixed now. part of the contest is all these vulnerabilities being fixed. a fun way to show off your skills and so every
. >> host: so it was developed by the u.s. government? >> guest: yes. according to some reporting by "the new york times." >> host: and what was its purpose? was it a defense mechanism? was it the defense department? >> guest: no. it was purely a offensive, preemptive effort the slow the nuclear weapons processing capability of iran. >> host: well, you mentioned charlie miller, and mr. miller is in st. louis, and he joins us today on "the communicators." mr. miller, what was your, what was your goal in breaking into the iphone? >> guest: well, in that particular case it was for a contest, like robert mentioned. they have this contest every year, hackers across the world enter it, and they have various devices. if you can break into the devices, you win some cash and the device itself. so that was my goal. i won that contest a few times. earlier in my career it was more about showing that things like iphones or, you know, desktops running apple software were vulnerable because it wasn't believed that it was, but now it's just, you know, i've shown vulnerables in iphone, i've found attacks
the federal government can work cooperatively with the private sector in improving u.s. competitiveness. and the administration did a number of different public private partnership in a lot of arena trying to boost our science and innovation capabilities. as a broad philosophical focus for what he thinks of as progressive agenda to help boost our economic -- around the globe. on telecom and communications in particular, i'm far less of an expert. i have to admit up front. in general, i would i think i would say it falls for the administration much more in to the regulatory arena how to deal with difference constituencies and businesses and trying to balance the different issues that different kinds of industries come at. so and i would also say that in many ways the administration looks on i may be speaking too bluntly. i think the administration looks on far-reaching investment in science and innovation and as their policy agenda compared to trying to work out where telecommunications and i.t. firms can invest because they can do that pretty well on their own. they're powerful and quic
in which the federal government can work cooperatively with the private sector in improving u.s. economic competitiveness in whatever range it is. and the administration's done a number of different public/private partnerships in a lot of arenas trying to boost our science and innovation capabilities, you know, as a broad philosophical focus for what he thinks of as a progressive agenda to help boost our economic competitiveness around the globe. on telecom and communications in paragraph, i am far -- in particular, i am far less of an expert than he is, i have to admit right up front. in general, i would say that really falls for the administration much more into the regulatory arena in how to deal with various different constituencies and various different businesses in trying to balance the different issues that different kinds of industries come at. so, and i would also say that in many ways the administration looks on -- and i may be speaking too broadly here -- i think the administration looks much more on far-reaching investments in science and innovation as their policy agenda com
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)